Cyber Safe

Better Cyber-Safe than Sorry

Regardless of calls for Australia to act at a political stage, there is a ton that singular organizations can do to shield against potential cyber dangers.

Above all, organizations ought to focus on having a safe organization in which they work. While it very well may be not difficult to find yourself mixed up with a misguided sensation that all is well and good and figure that your association will not be forced to bear any cyber attack, survey shows that it is turning out to be progressively increased.

Organizations should hence make the vital courses of move. Fortunately, research by Omdia shows that service providers are progressively centered around addressing to the security of their organization, however more work should be done.

For Organizations across Australia, actionable steps that can be taken include setting up next-generation firewalls to reduce the risks of attacks, installing threat-detecting software that can address attacks before any serious damage is done, and making sure that employees access data safely via secure data centres.

Services like these allow a company to gain a greater degree of visibility and control over the entire network, ultimately safeguarding them against potential threats. Nowadays, artificial intelligence (AI) and automation also play an important role in ensuring that the networks remain secure by analysing and highlighting any potential cyber threats before they strike and reducing the likelihood of human error.

For example, Japanese company Ricoh worked with Juniper Networks to build a secure and scalable network that allows more than 90,000 of its employees across the world to access and send data securely.

Part of this expansion included the instalment of threat prevention software, allowing the company to protect against both known and unknown threats, and analyse encrypted traffic.

With this said, the recent flurry of cyber attacks has shown the requirement for the central government to intercede and build up assembly that upholds both the private and public areas in their battle against cyber crimes and ransomware.

Given that the ACSC receives an average of 164 cyber crime reports per day, it is clear that threats are prevalent and requires more attention. World-leading policies, as well as innovation driven by our technology and security sectors will ensure Australia is ready to tackle whatever digital threat comes its way.
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As part of Australian Govt. Stay Smart Online partner, Computer Support Professionals can also measure the security health of your business with the latest industry leading tools and applications. We can help you to protect your business with the latest threat which can cause a security risk and damage your identity.

Widespread Emotet malicious software targeting businesses and individuals

What’s happened?

Emotet is a banking trojan malware program which obtains financial information by injecting computer code into the networking stack of an infected Microsoft Windows computer, allowing sensitive data to be stolen via transmission. Emotet malware also inserts itself into software modules which are then able to steal address book data and perform denial of service attacks on other systems. It also functions as a down-loader or dropper of other banking Trojans.

The Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC) is aware of a widespread malicious email virus (malware). Known as ‘Emotet’, targeting Australian businesses and individuals.

Cybercriminals use malware for different reasons. Most commonly to steal personal or valuable information from which they can profit. It hold recipients to ransom or install damaging programs onto devices without your knowledge. Do not pay the ransom if affected by ransomware. There is no guarantee that paying. The ransom will fix your computer, and it could make you vulnerable to further attacks. Restore your files from backup and seek technical advice.

How it works

The Emotet malware appears as a normal or useful file attachment in emails (.doc, .docx, .pdf). But includes hidden code which allows cybercriminals to access and control your devices or computer systems. It can also appear as a website hyperlink in emails.

Emotet malware infects devices or computers if users click on links or open files in these emails. You know, or an organisation you deal with.

The malware forwards itself to all the users’ email contacts, increasing the likelihood of further infection.

Here is an example of one of these emails, but it can come in many different formats.

Example of Emotet phishing email

How do I stay safe?

Always use caution before opening emails and attachments, and clicking on links.

To prevent malware infection, the ACSC recommends you take the following steps immediately:

  • Disable Microsoft Office macros. (Macros are small programs used to automate simple tasks in Microsoft Office documents but can be used maliciously – visit the Microsoft website for information on disabling macros in your version of Office.)
  • Maintain firewalls.
  • Make sure you have an offline backup of your information.

If you run a business. We recommend you also alert your staff to be aware of any emails that look unusual or suspicious. Refer to ACSC advice, www.cyber.gov.au/advice/improving-staff-awareness

The ACSC has also issued advice to help organisations protect systems and customer data.

Organisations that require further assistance or advice about Emotet malware can contact the ACSC by emailing ASD.Assist@defence.gov.au

For more information, please visit: www.staysmartonline.gov.au